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Monday, July 24, 2006

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE? CAOS or CALM SEAS?! ALL AHEAD FULL with all deliberate speed.



Personally, I prefer the old days when what happened at the Academy, stayed at the Academy.Staff officers treated all cadets the same. Any conduct that required more than a few demerits and some extra duty was considered the results of a failure in leadership. There was security in our obscurity.
That was before staff officers put their immediate interests above the reputation of the Academy and the future careers of the cadets. That was before press conferences were held to castigate cadets in the public media. Now the word has gone forth; the torch has been passed. It was on Doug Wisniewski's watch as Commandant of Cadets. The picture and profile of Cadet Webster Smith has been beamed over the internet from Aztec shores to Artic zone, to Europe and the Far East. The name and reputation of the Coast Guard Academy has been sullied. What an unnecessary tragedy!
What was sent out as a trickle has come back as a flood. Solomon was right. He that soweth the wind shall reap a whirlwind. Any man who troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind.
Webster Smith, U.S. Coast Guard, and Lamar Owens, U.S. Navy, are both senior black cadet football players. Both were charged with rape. Both were found not guilty. Both have expressed a sincere desire to remain in the service on active duty. They have apologized for their college fraternity-like pranks. In an Ivy League world we could move on. http://www.time.com/time/quotes/0,26174,1209244,00.html
Military academies do not graduate scholars. They graduate leaders of men. Smith and Owens have completed four years of Academy training. The few academic credits, if any that they missed can be completed on-line. They have fulfilled the requirements to receive their commissions.
The lesser charges that they were found guilty of were add-on and catch-all charges to ensure that the Government could get a conviction for something. Those charges are not serious enough to disqualify them from being commissioned officers.
When Webster Smith walks out of Goose Creek, South Carolina Naval Brig, he should be commissioned and sent to the fleet. Unfortunately, it looks like he will serve the entire length of his sentence. Not counting the pre-trial restraint, he has already served one month of a six month sentence. The Convening Authority, Admiral James Van Sice, will not take action on his court-martial for another six months. He is too busy. His staff is over-worked. Webster Smith can wait.
The mills of the legal gods grind slowly. There is so much that has to be done before Admiral Van Sice gets a chance to sign his name on the Convening Authority Action Report. The court reporter is using antiquated equipment. A record that should take no more than two days to transcribe could take months. Admiral Van Sice will wait until he has the entire package. That must consist of the authenticated transcript of the trial record, a recommendation from his staff legal officer, and any petitions for clemency from Webster SmithÂ’s attorney. In the mean time, Webster Smith is cooling his heels in the Navy Brig.
What happens to Webster Smith when he is release from the Navy brig? Does he go back to working on the docks until Admiral Van Sice has received the complete package? Since he has the right to continuing representation by his lawyers throughout the post-trial and appellate process, it would be reasonable to assume that he will remain on active duty until the entire process has run its course. Word is that his legal team has been beefed-up by some super heavy weight lawyers. If they were good enough for Adam Clayton Powell and Richard Nixon, they should be good enough for Mister Smith. Also, a civil rights complaint has been filed to take care of any issues that do not lend themselves to a purely legal solution.
The United States Court of Military Review, under Article 66 of the UCMJ, shall review all cases of trial by court-martial in which the sentence as approved by the Convening Authority extends to dismissal of a cadet from the Coast Guard, and/or a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge, unless the accused waives appellate review.
The Court may act only with respect to the findings and sentence as approved by the Convening authority. However, The Court may also review such other matters and take such other action as it deems to be proper under substantive law. The determination of any matter referred to the Court shall be according to the opinion of a majority of the judges participating in the decision.
Webster Smith may be represented before the Court by appellate counsel detailed in accordance with Article 70(a), or by civilian counsel or both. If he does not waive appellate review pursuant to Rule for Court-martial 1110, he has 10 days after service of Admiral Van Sice's Convening Authority action to advise Admiral Van Sice in writing that he requests assignment of military appellate defense counsel under Rule 10(a). The Court may request a military counsel when none has been assigned. Moreover, assigned military appellate counsel will continue to represent Webster Smith after appearance of civilian counsel unless Cadet Smith excuses him. The Court will regard civilian counsel as primary counsel.
Cadet Smith's appellate counsel will file with the Court in a brief an assignment of error setting forth separately each error asserted. Oral arguments may be heard at the discretion of the Court upon motion by either party. Such a motion must be made when the party's pleading is filed.
The Court may in its discretion reconsider its decision within 30 days after service of that decision on the accused or his appellate counsel. Decision of the Court of Military Review may be appealed to the Court of Military Appeals.
The Coast Guard Court of Military Review is made up of Coast Guard Officers. It has the power to decide matter of both fact and law. The Court of Military Appeals is made up of five civilian judges, appointed to 15 year terms. It decides only issues of law. All of its decisions are reported in the Military Justice Reporter and create precedent. It's decisions may be appealed to the U. S. Supreme Court. It is the highest court in the land. The appeal and the buck stops there.
Since Webster Smith's court-martial sentenced him to dismissal from the Coast Guard, that part of the sentence providing for dismissal may not be executed until approved by the Secretary of Homeland Security. Also, the Secretary may commute, remit, or suspend the sentence, as he sees fit. However, if Webster Smith exercises his rights to appellate review the Secretary cannot act until there is a final judgement as to the legality of the proceedings by the Court of Military Review and 60 days have passed after that and no appeal has been taken to the Court of Military Appeals.
Admiral Van Sice could save everyone a lot of time and trouble. He has the authority to suspend the execution of any sentence or part thereof. This entire mess could be over in a matter of months. Otherwise, Cadet Webster Smith could be lieutenant junior grade Webster Smith before the the entire package lands on the desk of the Secretary of Homeland Security.
If everyone plays by the rules, when the dust settles, Webster Smith could be Ensign or Lieutenant Webster Smith. This episode will be little more than a bad dream. Joanne Miller will be truly the Grand Lady of Academy Civil Rights. Van Sice can go back to brewing his beer with his picture on the label. Wisniewski will have decided what he plans to do in his next career, perhaps Dean of Students at Moorehouse. The Coast Guard Academy will have some super memorabilia for its ten million dollar museum.

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15 Comments:

Blogger ichbinalj said...

Coast Guard Career News - 07/06/06
This is an unofficial posting.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Officer Promotion Authorization Listing (OPAL) NO. 07-06
R 261932Z JUN 06 ZUI ASN-PSS177000703 PSN 417607H25
FM COMCOGARD PERSCOM ARLINGTON VA//OPM/RPM//
TO ALCGPERSCOM
BT
UNCLAS //N01427//
ALCGPERSCOM 038/06
SUBJ: OFFICER PROMOTION AUTHORIZATION LISTING (OPAL) NO. 07-06
A. PERSONNEL MANUAL (COMDTINST M1000.6 (SERIES))
B. RESERVE POLICY MANUAL (COMDTINST M1001.28(SERIES))
C. WEIGHT/PHYSICAL FITNESS STANDARDS FOR COAST GUARD MILITARY
PERSONNEL (COMDTINST M1020.8 (SERIES))
D. ALCOAST 064/01, CAREER INTENTION SURVEY PROGRAM
1. COMMANDING OFFICERS/OFFICERS EXERCISING ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL
MAY PROMOTE THE PERSONNEL LISTED BELOW, EFFECTIVE ON THE DATES
INDICATED. PAY AND ALLOWANCES OF THE GRADE TO WHICH PROMOTED ARE
AUTHORIZED FROM DATE OF RANK.
2. PRIOR TO PROMOTION, COMMANDING OFFICERS SHALL ENSURE COMPLIANCE
WITH PARA 5.A.13 OF REF (A) FOR ADPL PROMOTIONS TO O-2 THROUGH O-6,
PARA 5.B.6 OF REF (A) FOR ADPL PROMOTIONS TO CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER
AND SECTION 7.A.10 OF REF (B) FOR IDPL PROMOTIONS. COMMANDING
OFFICERS SHALL ALSO ENSURE COMPLIANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF REF
(C), UNLESS AN EXEMPTION HAS BEEN GRANTED. IF PROMOTION IS DELAYED,
CO SHALL NOTIFY: COMMANDER, COAST GUARD PERSONNEL COMMAND (OPM-1)
OR (RPM), PSC, AND SPO/PERSRU PRIOR TO THE AUTHORIZED PROMOTION
DATE.
3. IF A PROMOTION IS DELAYED UNDER THESE PROVISIONS, FURTHER
PROCEEDINGS UNDER CHAPTER 12 OF REF (A) OR SECTION 8.A. OF REF (B)
WILL DEPEND UPON THE CIRCUMSTANCES LEADING TO THE DELAY. WHEN AN
OFFICER WHOSE PROMOTION HAS BEEN DELAYED SUBSEQUENTLY MEETS THE
STANDARDS FOR PROMOTION, COMMANDING OFFICERS SHALL NOTIFY
COMMANDER, CGPC (OPM-1) OR (RPM) AND REQUEST AUTHORITY TO PROMOTE
THE OFFICER. COMMANDER, CGPC (OPM-1) OR (RPM) WILL AUTHORIZE
PROMOTION WITH A DATE OF RANK AT THE TIME THE OFFICER WOULD HAVE
BEEN PROMOTED HAD THE PROMOTION NOT BEEN DELAYED. IF THE DELAY
RESULTED FROM NOT MEETING THE STANDARDS OF REF (C), PAY AND
ALLOWANCES ACCRUE FROM THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF PROMOTION, NOT THE
BACK DATE OF RANK.
4. AS PER ARTICLE 12.C.9 OF REF (A), ACCEPTANCE OF PROMOTION
OBLIGATES OFFICERS TO SERVE TWO YEARS TIME IN GRADE (TIG)
PRIOR TO RETIREMENT. CURRENTLY, SERVICE NEEDS ASSOCIATED WITH WORK
FORCE MANAGEMENT IN ALL OFFICER GRADES WILL NOT ALLOW TIG
WAIVERS. THE TIG REQUIREMENT DOES NOT APPLY TO AN OFFICER RESIGNING
HIS OR HER COMMISSION.
5. THE FOLLOWING PROMOTIONS ARE AUTHORIZED:
TO REAR ADMIRAL: STATUS DOR UNIT
BRECKENRIDGE,JODY A. REGULAR 01JUL2006 CGD ELEVEN
BROOKS,ARTHUR E. REGULAR 01JUL2006 CGD SEVENTEEN
ROSA,FRED M. REGULAR 01JUL2006 COMMANDANT
SULLIVAN,TIMOTHY S. REGULAR 01JUL2006 COMMANDANT
ACTON,JOHN C. RESERVE 01JUL2006 CG LANTAREA
TO REAR ADMIRAL (LOWER HALF):
JUSTICE,WAYNE E. REGULAR 01JUL2006 COMMANDANT
SALERNO,BRIAN M. REGULAR 01JUL2006 COMMANDANT
PARKER,ROBERT C. REGULAR 01JUL2006 COMMANDANT
BURHOE,JOHN S. REGULAR 01JUL2006 COMMANDANT
BROWN,MANSON K. REGULAR 01JUL2006 CG MLCPAC
SEWARD,MICHAEL R. RESERVE 01JUL2006 HDCU 111

LAW LIMITS THE NUMBER OF LCDR AND ABOVE PROMOTIONS, AND THE
NUMBER IS AUTHORIZED EACH YEAR BY COMMANDANT. EACH CONTROLLED GRADE
CAN ONLY COMPRISE A CERTAIN PERCENTAGE OF THE TOTAL OFFICER CORPS.
EVEN IF THE COAST GUARD HAS VACANT BILLETS IN A CONTROLLED GRADE,
WE CAN ONLY PROMOTE OFFICERS UNTIL WE REACH OUR AUTHORIZATION CAP.
THAT IS WHY WE SOMETIMES FILL LCDR BILLETS WITH LTS. THE AUTHORIZED
NUMBER OF OFFICERS IN EACH CONTROLLED GRADE IS DETERMINED EVERY
YEAR IN MAY AFTER THE ACADEMY CLASS GRADUATES AND THE COAST GUARD
OFFICER CORPS IS AT ITS LARGEST. PROMOTION NUMBERS FOR CONTROLLED
GRADES ARE SIGNIFICANTLY LARGER DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS DUE TO THE
HIGHER NUMBERS OF OFFICER SEPARATIONS DURING THESE MONTHS.
10. PER REFERENCE (D), MEMBERS BEING PROMOTED ARE ENCOURAGED TO
PARTICIPATE IN THE CAREER INTENTION SURVEY PROGRAM ON THE INTRANET
AT: HTTP://CGWEB.USCG.MIL/G-W/HRSYSTEMS/SURVEY/COVER-INTRO.HTML.
UNDERSTANDING WHY PEOPLE STAY IN THE COAST GUARD IS VITAL TO THE
CONTINUED WELL-BEING OF OUR ORGANIZATION. YOUR PARTICIPATION IS THE
KEY TO AN ACCURATE ASSESSMENT. THANK YOU FOR TAKING TIME TO
PARTICIPATE.
11. POC FOR RESERVE OFFICERS IS LCDR MICHAEL SMITH CGPC-RPM-1 (202)
493-1702. POC FOR REGULAR OFFICERS IS LT MICHAEL KAHLE CGPC-OPM-1E
(202) 493-1620
12. INTERNET RELEASE AUTHORIZED.
BT
NNNN

2:49 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

A Black cadet named J. Webster Smith was court-martialed at West Point in 1874. He had to wait 123 years to get his commission.
West Point's first Black cadet gets commission - ex-slave James Webster Smith got his commission 123 years after being expelled from West Point after suffering continued racial harassment.
The U.S. Army finally has commissioned West Point's first Black cadet, 123 years after the former slave was expelled for failing an exam despite enduring years of racial harassment there.

"It's never too late to right a wrong," said Army Secretary Togo D. West Jr.

Jame's Webster Smith's commissioning certificate and gold second lieutenant's bars were presented to South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, SC, where they will go on display because Smith has no known descendants.

Smith, born a slave in Columbia, SC, entered the U.S. Military Academy in 1870, five years after the end of the Civil War. From the start, he was harassed by White cadets, according to an Army review of the case.

Other cadets refused to have anything to do with him except on official business. He was denied the right to eat with other cadets and had slop poured on him at night.

He was court-martialed twice, had to repeat a year and was finally expelled for failing an examination at the end of his junior year. Despite the hardships, Smith stuck out four years at the academy.

Secretary West said cadets should be able to expect support from other cadets and the academy.

"That was not here for Cadet Smith," West said. "The record has waited to be corrected. A wrong has waited to be lighted. A nation's ideals have waited to be vindicated."

Smith later served as commandant of cadets at South Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical Institute, which became South Carolina State. He died at age 26 of tuberculosis.

Members of the state's congressional delegation, Reps. John Spratt and Jim Clyburn pushed to get commissions for Smith.

COPYRIGHT 1997 Johnson Publishing Co.
COPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group

5:02 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

By DERRILL HOLLY
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - The former quarterback of the U.S. Naval Academy football team said Friday that he hopes to salvage his military career despite a felony conviction stemming from a sexual relationship he had with a fellow midshipman.
I still want to be a Naval officer," Midshipman Lamar S. Owens Jr., told the five Naval officers on the jury panel that acquitted him Thursday of a rape charge lodged by the young woman. Owens said the ordeal that began within days of the Jan. 29 encounter that resulted in his court-martial will make him a better officer capable of dealing with adversity.

"You always have to be on your guard because every decision you make could be an important decision," Owens told the court. Since early February, Owens has been in limbo. While he completed his studies with a 2.7 grade point average over four years, he has not been awarded his economics degree. He also did receive his ensign's commission with other 2006 graduates.

Instead of beginning training as a surface warfare officer, Owens is spending a fifth summer at the school that trains future Naval and Marine Corps officers. Whether he gets a fleet commission could hinge on a decision made by Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, the academy's superintendent who referred the Owens case for court-martial.

The jury's decision sends the case back to Annapolis, where Rempt will have the options of dismissing the midshipman from the academy, or allowing him to graduate, and perhaps pursue his dream.

"Preventing and deterring sexual harassment, misconduct and assault is a critically important issue," Rempt said in written statement released by the academy. The statement offered no information on how Owens' status will be resolved, but did indicate that the Academy respects the findings of the court.

Still, Owens' actions last winter violated several academy regulations, including those prohibiting sexual contact on campus and fraternization between members of the same company. There is also the Feb. 15 violation of a written military protective order which required Owens to stay out of the vicinity of his accuser and her room, one floor below his in Bancroft Hall.
According to Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Roper, the academy's legal adviser, such administrative violations have been considered on a case-by-case basis, even when they have involved midshipman from the academy's leadership cadre.

"There have been some separated, and some retained," said Roper, who was called as a witness by the defense during the mitigation phase of the sentencing hearing. She told the court that some midshipmen facing administrative penalties do graduate and are commissioned.
According to Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Roper, the academy's legal adviser, such administrative violations have been considered on a case-by-case basis, even when they have involved midshipman from the academy's leadership cadre.

"There have been some separated, and some retained," said Roper, who was called as a witness by the defense during the mitigation phase of the sentencing hearing. She told the court that some midshipmen facing administrative penalties do graduate and are commissioned.
By DERRILL HOLLY
Associated Press Writer

6:26 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

Four midshipmen called as witnesses in the Lamar Owens case received immunity in the case, including one who was commissioned an ensign in May. Owens' 20-year-old accuser also was among those who received immunity and will begin her senior year at the academy this fall.

"Our first concern would be for her safety and to make sure she has access to services for any physical or emotional trauma that's resulted from this experience," said Anita Sanchez, communications director of the Miles Foundation. The organization, based in Newtown, Conn. tracks violence against women in the military, is hoping that new regulations taking effect in autumn of 2007 will give military courts more options in defining charges to make prosecution of such cases easier.

The regulations include the addition of different types and degrees of sexual assault to deal with date rape, acquaintance rape or offender-known attacks, Sanchez said.

Since 2001, there have been 56 rape accusations at the Naval Academy resulting in two convictions, including one in a civilian court. Others accused in those cases were disciplined within the academy's conduct system and allowed to resign.

Some experts believe that stepped up investigations and prosecutions of such cases indicate a commitment by the service academies to confront the problem.

"When you prosecute, you essentially say a law has been broken and you are standing on behalf of the community against this type of behavior," said David Lisak, a psychologist at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. "It's up to juries to decide these cases," said Lisak, who serves as a consultant to the U.S. Air Force on the sexual policy issues.

"The challenge is for the academy, and the colleges in general, to have policies in place to protect women," said Reid Weingarten, the civilian attorney who represented Owens. He said he expects the academy to take another look at the allegations that led to Owens' court-martial, considering his acquittal on the most serious charge.

(Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

6:30 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

R 182000Z JUL 06
FM COMDT COGARD WASHINGTON DC//G-C//
TO ALCOAST
BT
UNCLAS //N01401//
ALCOAST 387/06
COMDTNOTE 1401
SUBJ: ACTIVE DUTY REAR ADMIRAL (LOWER HALF) SELECTION BOARD
1. THE SECRETARY HAS APPROVED THE REPORT OF THE SELECTION BOARD
CONVENED ON 10 JUL 2006 RECOMMENDING OFFICERS ON THE ACTIVE DUTY
PROMOTION LIST (ADPL) FOR PROMOTION TO THE GRADE OF REAR ADMIRAL
(LOWER HALF). OFFICERS SELECTED ARE LISTED BELOW IN PRECEDENCE
ORDER.
NAME UNIT
(1) CAPT CYNTHIA A. COOGAN COMDT (G-C)
(2) CAPT DAVID T. GLENN CGDSEVENTEEN
(3) CAPT PAUL F. ZUKUNFT CGDFOURTEEN
(4) CAPT RONALD J. RABAGO MLCLANT
(5) CAPT CHRISTOPHER C. COLVIN LANTAREA
(6) CAPT MARY E. LANDRY CGDONE
(7) CAPT THOMAS F. ATKIN OSD/ASD LIAISON
2. THE BOARD MEMBERSHIP AND UNITS ARE LISTED BELOW:
NAME UNIT
VADM VIVIEN S. CREA, USCG COMDT (G-CV)
RADM STEPHEN W. ROCHON, USCG MLCLANT
RADM ARTHUR E. BROOKS, USCG CGD SEVENTEEN
RADM DAVID P. PEKOSKE, USCG COMDT (G-R)
RDML ROBERT S. BRANHAM, USCG COMDT (CG-8)
RDML CRAIG E. BONE, USCG COMDT (G-P)
3. ALTHOUGH THE PROCEEDINGS OF A SELECTION BOARD, INCLUDING ITS
DELIBERATIONS AND CRITERIA FOR SELECTION, CANNOT BE DISCLOSED TO
ANY PERSON WHO WAS NOT A MEMBER OF THE BOARD, BOARD MEMBERS DO HAVE
VALUABLE INFORMATION THAT CAN BE SHARED REGARDING THE GENERAL
SELECTION PROCESS AND ITS FAIRNESS AND EQUITY. IF THERE ARE ANY
QUESTIONS REGARDING THE RESULTS OF THE ADPL BOARD, CONTACT CDR DON
JACCARD AT 202-493-1611.
4. THE PRECEPT WHICH CONVENED THE ADPL RDML BOARD AND CHARGED THE
MEMBERS WITH THEIR DUTIES, AND THE COMDT'S GUIDANCE FOR PROMOTION
YEAR 2007 SELECTION BOARDS, ARE AVAILABLE VIA THE CGPC (OPM-1) CG
INTERNET SITE HTTP://WWW.USCG.MIL/HQ/CGPC/OPM/BOARDS/BOARDS.HTM
OR BY CALLING YN2 AIMEE BOCKSNICK AT 202-493-1615.
5. INTERNET RELEASE AUTHORIZED.
6. ADM THAD ALLEN, COMMANDANT, SENDS.
BT

6:44 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

Rear Admiral

Manson K. Brown

Commander, Maintenance & Logistics Command Pacific


Rear Admiral (lower half) Manson K. Brown is a native of Washington, DC. He graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 1978 with a Bachelors of Science degree in Civil Engineering. Rear Admiral Brown holds a Masters of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and a Masters of Science degree in National Resources Strategy from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. He is a registered professional civil engineer. He assumed command of Maintenance & Logistics Command Pacific in June 2006.

Previous tours of duty include Assistant Engineering Officer in USCGC GLACIER, Project Engineer at Civil Engineering Unit Miami, Deputy Group Commander at Coast Guard Group Mayport, Engineering Assignment Officer in the Officer Personnel Division at Coast Guard Headquarters, Facilities Engineer at Support Center Alameda, and Assistant Chief, Civil Engineering Division at Maintenance & Logistics Command Pacific.

Rear Admiral Brown’s previous commands include Commander, Coast Guard Sector Honolulu and Commander, Coast Guard Group Charleston. From 1999 to 2002, he served as the Military Assistant to the U.S. Secretary of Transportation (DOT), including duty as the Acting Deputy Chief of Staff for six months after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In May 2003, he served as the Chief of Officer Personnel Management at the Coast Guard Personnel Command. From April to July 2004, he was temporarily assigned as the Senior Advisor for Transportation to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad, Iraq. Working in a combat zone, he oversaw restoration of Iraq’s major transportation systems, including two major ports.

Rear Admiral Brown’s military decorations include the U.S. Transportation Secretary’s Gold Medal, Legion of Merit, four Meritorious Service Medals, two Coast Guard Commendation Medals, the Transportation 9-11 Medal, three Coast Guard Achievement Medals, the Iraq Campaign Medal and several other personal and unit awards. In 1994, Rear Admiral Brown was honored as the first recipient of the Coast Guard’s Captain John G. Witherspoon Award for Inspiration Leadership. He is married to the former Herminia Banez of California, and has three grown sons: Justin, Robert, and Matthew.

9:52 AM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

FlashBack- June 1973. LT. London Steverson personally sponsors Manson K. Brown to become a cadet at the USCGA. An honors graduate from prestigious Saint John's High School in Washington, DC. As Chief, Minority Recruiting Section, CG Hq, Steverson started the Sponsor Program to keep other colleges from stealing Black prospects after the CG had identified and gained their interest. Manson K. Brown entered the USCGA in the Class of 1978.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Steverson
FastForward to June 2006.
(June 22, 2006) Admiral Transfers Helm of CG's Pacific Support Command

Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area Vice Adm. Charles D. Wurster, looks on as Rear Adm. Jody A. Breckenridge congratulates Rear Adm. Manson K. Brown after officially handing over command of Coast Guard Maintenance and Logistics Command Pacific today during a change of command ceremony at Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif. The Maintenance and Logistics Command provides support to Coast Guard units and people located west of the Rocky Mountains and across 73 million square miles of the Pacific Ocean to ensure Coast Guard vessels and shore activities are fully capable of meeting their assigned missions by providing a broad range of support. Breckenridge took the helm of the co-located Eleventh Coast Guard District on March 30, 2006. Brown recently transferred from Honolulu, Hawaii, where he was commander of Coast Guard Sector Honolulu. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer Mariana O'Leary.

10:02 AM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

FlashBack- June 1973. LT. London Steverson personally sponsors Manson K. Brown to become a cadet at the USCGA. An honors graduate from prestigious Saint John's High School in Washington, DC. As Chief, Minority Recruiting Section, CG Hq, Steverson started the Sponsor Program to keep other colleges from stealing Black prospects after the CG had identified and gained their interest. Manson K. Brown entered the USCGA in the Class of 1978.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Steverson
FastForward to June 2006.
(June 22, 2006) Admiral Transfers Helm of CG's Pacific Support Command

Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area Vice Adm. Charles D. Wurster, looks on as Rear Adm. Jody A. Breckenridge congratulates Rear Adm. Manson K. Brown after officially handing over command of Coast Guard Maintenance and Logistics Command Pacific today during a change of command ceremony at Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif. The Maintenance and Logistics Command provides support to Coast Guard units and people located west of the Rocky Mountains and across 73 million square miles of the Pacific Ocean to ensure Coast Guard vessels and shore activities are fully capable of meeting their assigned missions by providing a broad range of support. Breckenridge took the helm of the co-located Eleventh Coast Guard District on March 30, 2006. Brown recently transferred from Honolulu, Hawaii, where he was commander of Coast Guard Sector Honolulu. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer Mariana O'Leary.

10:02 AM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

ADMIRAL VAN SICE BREWS ADMIRAL AMBER ALE with his picture on the label at taxpayers expense!
Sobering Revelations
What home-brewed beer at the coast Guard Academy and wasted taxpayer
money
in other parts of the country have to say about the state of homeland
security.
By Day Staff Writer

Published on 7/26/2006 in Editorial » Editorial

The Coast Guard Academy, as the whole nation now knows by way of a U.S.
Government Accountability Office investigation, has been brewing its
own
boutique beers, including an Admiral Amber Ale with a picture of
Academy
Superintendent Rear Adm. James C. Van Sice on its label.

Academy officials said the spoof beers were used as “ice breakers” at
social
occasions. The endeavor, abandoned in the glare of publicity, would be
harmless enough were it not for the way the equipment and supplies were
procured.

What caught the attention of GAO auditors was the use of a Department
of
Homeland Security purchase card issued for homeland-security purposes
to buy
about $230 worth of equipment and supplies used to make the beer.
Another
$800 for the beer ingredients came from the public nonprofit Coast
Guard
Foundation Inc., normally dedicated to loftier purposes, like education
grants.

The GAO cited the beer equipment as one of the more outrageous examples
among hundreds of thousands of dollars in wasteful and possibly
fraudulent
purchases made with the Homeland Security purchase cards. The program,
expanded last year to expedite hurricane relief aid to the Gulf Coast,
essentially put 9,000 credit cards in the hands of Homeland Security
personnel with little or poor oversight on how they could be used.

You don't have to be an accountability expert to see the inherent risk
of
human fallibility here.

The GAO cited instances of large purchases made at prices higher than
retail, the purchase of equipment that was never accounted for and the
use
of cards to pay for government training at expensive resorts. Some
officials
had supervision over so many cardholders they couldn't keep track of
them.
In other instances the cardholder was the approving official, a clear
conflict, the auditors said.

And in cases where questionable spending was flagged for audit, and the
cardholder did not respond to requests for information, spending was
allowed
to continue anyway, the report said.

In the realm of billion-dollar budgets within the Department of
Homeland
Security, the amount wasted, or even stolen, in the purchase card
program
may be almost trivial. What is more worrisome than the amount of money
involved is the suggestion of such disarray in an agency charged with
the
nation's security.

The GAO auditors specifically cited a lack of leadership in setting up
adequate training, implementation and basic accounting controls for
this
program. Could these organizational failures be a symptom of larger and
more
ominous organizational problems within the agency? The DHS track record
in
disaster relief is abysmal.

Sens. Joseph Lieberman and Susan Collins, the Republican from Maine,
have
been successful in using their Senate Homeland Security and
Governmental
Affairs Committee to prod aggressive oversight of homeland security
programs
like the paycards. A new GAO undercover unit also recently helped
uncover
widespread misuse of disaster relief given out in the wake of the 2005
hurricanes.

As summer drifts closer to the height of the 2006 hurricane season, and
long
before the next round of audits and investigations, we unfortunately
might
again find ourselves assessing relief efforts firsthand as they unfold
on
cable news networks. Let's hope the department is learning from these
embarrassing lapses in management.

11:19 AM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

Coast Guard Academy Has Drifted Far Off Course
Sex scandal reveals failings at the very core of Academy's approaches to traning.
By Patrick H. Knowles Jr. 7/30/2006 in Editorial » Perspective.

The Coast Guard Academy has three primary functions: educate young men and women; train them in the art and science of maritime military service; and align and transform their values to those required by the institution and the service. It is in this last function that we have apparently witnessed a systemic breakdown and failure.
The recent Cadet Webster Smith debacle provided evidence of individual moral and values breakdown – both on the part of Mr. Smith as well as many of the women involved. There was enough drunken and lewd behavior that no one made a sympathetic figure. Digital photos, drinking to the point of vomiting and blacking out, extortion, “career ending” indiscretions, casual sex with multiple partners – Hollywood couldn't have written anything as salacious as this depressing reality.

As tragic as these individual failings were, the truly sad and disturbing thought is they indicate a systemic failure of the Academy to mold the values of individuals to those values vital and necessary to the organization – the U.S. Coast Guard. In days of yore, the values system of the incoming cadets was closely aligned with those deemed necessary by the service. Typically, any course corrections were minor in nature.

Today, the task of realigning values systems is not easy, given the society from which the Academy draws its candidates. The values and mores outside the gates are at times far removed from those required inside. But molding the values of individuals to those of the organization is the task that is before the Coast Guard Academy – and it is the task the American taxpayer deserves to see fulfilled.

Given this systemic failure, one can only hope the superintendent orders a bottom-up review of how the academy does business. Those officers charged with leading the professional development of cadets should be formally versed in alcohol and substance abuse, adolescent behavior and development, and psychology. Gone are the days when officers are deemed ready to assume these roles simply by virtue of having attained the lofty rank of lieutenant.

Some sort of advanced training or degree program should be a mandatory prerequisite before assuming such a post. These days, simply being an officer is no longer sufficient qualification for the responsibility of transforming cadets into officers.

The system of recognizing and assigning responsibility to cadets must be carefully examined, for the “best and the brightest” appear to be among those demonstrating risky behavior. Cadets exhibiting and recognized for the highest academic and military proficiency were part of this tale of drunkenness and debauchery.

Seemingly intelligent, motivated and ambitious women (upwards of seven) all 'hooked-up' with a single man, and all within an eight month time period. Given the small, close-knit nature of the Academy, I imagine these liaisons were widely known.

Regardless of the outcome, this behavior is just plain stupid. If Academy officials think this aberrant behavior isn't being carried out on a larger scale, they are being deliberately naive.

The recently adopted leadership policy of allowing the “Corps (of Cadets) to lead the Corps” must be recognized for what it is – an abject failure. Cadets are bright, motivated, ambitious, and frequently mature. We cannot lose sight of the fact that they are also adolescents. This means they are typically interested in the present, with limited thoughts of the future; they enter into frequently changing relationships; and they engage in experimentation with sex and alcohol.

The best way, the only way, to regain control of the behavior of adolescent cadets is to increase the adult supervision. Officers tasked with cadet professional development must become even more involved in the day-to-day operations of the Corps of Cadets. The visibility of adult supervisors must be increased. A doubling or trebling of the overnight watchstanders in the barracks would seem to be in order.

An essential part of this review should include a discussion about accountability – staff and faculty accountability. Despite attempts to “individualize” this event (the “one bad apple” scenario), this debacle is a likely harbinger of a much larger problem.

How did this problem go unrecognized? Why are there not systems and procedures in place to detect the aberrant behavior recently splashed across the front pages? How is it that cadets singled out for their military proficiency can simultaneously engage in perilous behavior – is the system that singles them out as being “superior cadets” somehow flawed? Is there a need to think “outside the box” on the issues of alcohol consumption and cadet romantic relationships?

It is not enough to declare revulsion with sexual assault. The systemic problem is not one of incomplete, inefficient, or unclear reporting procedures or processes. Those are management issues. The problem is about a system that appears unsuccessful in aligning cadet values to the point that they demonstrate conduct becoming a gentleman – or a lady. These are leadership issues.

There isn't just a single alligator under the water, in all likelihood there are several. And they are not of a single gender either. The Coast Guard Academy would do well to drain the swamp and rid itself of them all...before the next one rears up and bites the academy in the you-know-what.

Patrick H. Knowles Jr. is a 1983 CGA graduate. He completed a 20-year career, retiring as a lieutenant commander. He spent the last nine years of his career as an Academy engineering professor, and assisting in the summer leadership training of Academy cadets. Among his duties he was an overnight watchstander in the Cadet Barracks, He remains active in the Academy community.

12:30 PM  
Blogger watchdog2 said...

Sulmasy Earns Service Medal




Published on 7/23/2006 in Military » Military Briefs



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New London — A founder of the leadership institute at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy received the service's Meritorious Service Medal for his work training cadets through the nascent program.
Cmdr. Glenn Sulmasy, a permanent academy faculty member and expert in international security law, received the medal in a ceremony Tuesday. He acted as director of the institute from May 2005 to June 2006.

Sulmasy has begun a sabbatical that will extend through the next school year. He will teach at the University of California in Berkley while working on a book.




orious Service

4:50 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

U.S. Coast Guard Turns 216
U.S. Coast Guard | August 04, 2006
WASHINGTON – Coast Guard members stationed around the globe will celebrate as America's oldest, continuous sea-going service observes its 216th birthday Friday.

"I'm incredibly proud of our dedicated Coast Guard men and women," said Adm. Thad W. Allen, commandant of the Coast Guard. "As a multi-mission, maritime, and military service, we continue to grow and evolve to help guarantee the maritime safety, security and stewardship of our oceans and waterways. Whether it's saving lives, supporting the global war on terrorism, preserving our maritime environment and its resources, or protecting our vital waters for trade and commerce, Coast Guard men and women perform their duties every day with relentless courage, commitment and ingenuity."

The Coast Guard is one of America's five armed forces and traces it roots to Aug. 4, 1790, when the first Congress authorized the construction of a fleet of "revenue marine" cutters to enforce the fledgling nation's tariff and trade laws and protect the collection of federal revenue. The service expanded in size and responsibilities as the nation grew and today is responsible for many diverse missions, including maritime homeland security, national defense, enforcing maritime law, aiding mariners in distress, maintaining maritime navigation aids, protecting the marine environment, licensing merchant mariners and ensuring merchant vessel safety. The Coast Guard transferred into the newly created Department of Homeland Security in 2003.

The service received its present name in 1915 under an act of Congress when the Revenue Cutter Service merged with the Life-Saving Service.

The Coast Guard is one of the oldest organizations of the federal government and, until the Navy Department was established in 1798, served as the nation's only armed force afloat. The Coast Guard has continued to protect the nation throughout its long history – both at home and abroad – and Coast Guardsmen have proudly served in every one of the nation's major conflicts, including Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Around the clock and around the globe, the Coast Guard protects America's interests and keeps its citizens and resources safe and secure. Each day the dedicated men and women of the Coast Guard will:

– Save 15 lives

– Assist 114 people in distress

– Conduct 82 search-and-rescue cases

– Protect $4.9 million in property

– Enforce 103 security zones

– Interdict and rescue 26 illegal migrants at sea

– Board four high interest vessels

– Enforce 115 security zones

– Board 202 vessels of law enforcement interest

– Board 122 large vessels for port safety/security checks

– Seize 27 pounds of marijuana and 927 pounds of cocaine with a street value of $12.4 million

– Conduct 311 vessel safety checks and teach 57 boating safety courses

– Conduct 19 commercial fishing vessel safety exams and issue seven fishing vessel compliance decals

– Respond to 11 oil, chemical, or hazardous material environmental pollution incidents totaling 2,181 gallons

– Process 280 mariner licenses and documents

– Service 140 aids to navigation

– Monitor the transit of 2,557 commercial ships through U.S. ports

– Track 3,004 vessels in the Automated Merchant Vessel Reporting system

– Investigate 27 activities for marine violation of federal statutes

The U.S. Coast Guard is a military, maritime, multi-mission service within the Department of Homeland Security dedicated to protecting the safety and security of America.

7:19 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

Coast Guard Needs To Promote Responsibility
To The Editor Of The Day:

Published on 8/2/2006 in Editorial » Letters to The Editor


The recent rape trial of a Coast Guard Academy cadet has brought to
light a
disturbing problem other than sexual intimidation. That problem is
binge
drinking.
According to trial testimony, both male and female cadets participate.
This
is not good. Such activity on or off campus should not be tolerated.
Can a
future officer of the Coast Guard exercise proper judgment if he or she
is
hung over or, God forbid, drunk?

The more recent use of Homeland Security money by high level academy
officers to brew beer further underlines a lifestyle of more drinking
after
you graduate.

Time for a change, Coast Guard Academy. Let's promote more positive,
less
destructive ways in dealing with the stress of such an important
service to
our country.

7:39 PM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

CONFESSION IS FIRST STEP TOWARD REHABILITATION.

http://www.time.com/time/quotes/0,26174,1209244,00.html

9:41 AM  
Blogger ichbinalj said...

International Herald Tribune - France
(The Associated Press) WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007
Lawyers for a former cadet who was the first student court-martialed in the 130-year history of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy's are seeking to reverse his convictions for sexual misconduct.
Oral Arguments before the Coast Guard Court of Military Appeals is set for 16 January 2008 in Arlington, Va.

11:00 AM  

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